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101 Une plaque commémorative a été apposée dans l'église de Nocé en 1963. Laporte dit St-Georges Jacques
 
102 Fille du roi Latouche Marguerite
 
103 Fille du roi Lefebvre Marie
 
104 Of St-Martin de Morsain, Diocese of Soissons, Ile-de-France, France. Lefebvre Pierre
 
105 Fille du roi Leroux Marie
 
106 Mathurin LORION was born between 1598 and 1605 and came to Canada with three daughters early in 1658. We know that he was a labourer in Ste. Soulle (near La Rochelle) in 1647, the same at nearby Dompierre in 1649 and also when his daughter Jeanne was baptized in 1651 at the village of des Brandes, about 12 kilometers from La Rochelle. He was living in La Rochelle on Rue St. Claire on the 8 Dec 1657 when his daughter Renée was baptized, but was in Montreal by October 1858.
Mathurin was married three times before coming to Canada (but the dates given by Tanguay are probably wrong). His first wife Marie Barbier presumably died before 1635 when he married
Francoise Morin. The first known child Catherine was the daughter of Francoise and was born in 1636. Francoise died 6 Nov 1648 when she was 43 years old (records of Notre Dame, La Rochelle).
We have located his marriage record to Jeanne BIZET 6 months later at St. Marguerite's in La Rochelle. His name is then spelled LAURION. Jeanne's two brothers, Philippe (also a labourer) and
Jean were witnesses to her marriage. Philippe was born at St. Georges du Bois and married Andrée Bertrand, daughter of Guillaume and Marguerite LETARD, on 1 May 1645. At this time, his mother Francoise was dead but his father André was still alive.
Several children died young, and it is possible that Pierre and a sister, name unknown, who died two years later in 1657 at La Rochelle, were twins. The oldest daughter Catherine came to Canada some years before her father, possibly with her first husband. Her first three husbands (she married 4 times)
died rather violently: the first was crushed by a tree, the second drowned, and the third was burned to death in his house.
Renée was nearly 17 when she married a newly discharged soldier from the Carignan Salières regiment, Jean Delpue dit Pariso.
Mathurin had a plot of land in Montreal as shown in the census of 1663. By 1681, he had 12 arpents of land, 2 rifles and 2 cows. 
Lorion Mathurin
 
107 SOUR @S2@
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Love Elizabeth Anna
 
108 SOUR @S37@
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PAGE Database online.
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Love Mary Jane
 
109 They resided in the Parish of Bourg, Brittany, France. Mailloux Jacques
 
110 aboard the Madonna Mailloux dit Desmoulins Pierre
 
111 New France welcomed two immigrants bearing the last name of Mailloux, Michel and Pierre. Two brothers from Brie-sous-Matha, today, in the Canton of Matha, the Arrondisement of Saint-Jean d'Angely, the Department of La Charente-Maritime, formerly Saintonge. They were the sons of the merchant Jacques Mailloux and Suzanne Arnaud. Michel and Pierre were baptized, at the church dedicated at Saint-Pierre. Michel, on the first of December 1641 and Pierre, on the November 10, 1635, under the first name of Jean. They had two known sisters. Suzanne, who was born, on June 14, 1633 and Marie, who came into the world, on September 4, 1644. Michel was married, in his native village, on February 9, 1659, to Jeanne Mercier, in the presence of the curate Mecheureuse. Michel and Jeanne came to Canada about 1669. As proof, Michel was confirmed, at Quebec, on April 8, 1670. In the census of 1681, the couple was living, in the Seigneurie of La Durantaye. Responsible for eight daughters, Michel did not leave his family name to descendants. The life of the elder brother, Pierre Mailloux, holds our attention in this chapter.

- QUEBEC In France, Fabien Marot, was the Captain of the 150 ton ship LA VIERGE, hired Pierre Mailloux, on March 13, 1657, in the name of the Sieurs Antoine Lucas and Michel Jambon, to serve, in Canada. His promised salary for three years was 72 livres annually. The ship left La Rochelle, in April. It docked, at the port of Quebec, on Sunday, May 27, 1657, under the command of the same Fabien Marot. At the first opportunity, Pierre registered, his indenture contract, of March 13, in the records, of the Notary Guillaume Audouart, of Quebec. It is possible to cite Pierre's work schedule until the end of 1660. On December 27, of that year, Pierre dit Desmoulins, brought an arpent, of frontal land, on the boundary line, which separates the concession, in the village of Fargy, in the said Beauport. The purchase was made from Michel Belanger, probably Michel Belanger dit Le Prince, originally from Saint-Jean d'Angely, in Saintonge. Pierre promised to pay 40 livres tournois, when the ship comes back next year, in 1661. The witnesses to this purchase were Rene Dubois, Pierre Marcoux and Jean Crete. The latter signed with the large initials in the presence of the Notary Paul Vachon. Thus it was that, Pierre Mailloux became a resident of Beauport. No one has yet been able to figure out from where the surname Desmoulins (of the mill) came from.

- ANNE DELAUNAY After four years in the Colony, Pierre was ready and able to set up his home. Along the way, he had met Anne Delaunay, baptized, in the Calvinist church of La Rochelle, on July 25, 1635, the daughter of Louis Delaunay, a doctor and Marguerite Cazalede and the grandaughter of Claude Delaunay, who was married, in the Protestant church of the same place, on March 21, 1580, to Anne Barbier. Anne's sister, Jeanne, was also married, at Quebec, on November 30, 1662, to Jean de Lespinasse. On September 21, 1661, Anne and Pierre appeared at the house of Jean de Lauzon, with the Notary Guillaume Audouart, to have their contract and promise of marriage drafted. Supporting the bride were Anne Gasnier, chaperone of the marriageable girls, who had come to the country, Jean Bourdon, Anne's husband, Jean Guyon and Paul Vachon. The lovebirds wanted to live in community property and to solemnize their union, in the Catholic church. Pierre offered a dowry of 200 livres. Anne and Pierre did not know how to write.
The nuptial blessing was given by Father Charles de Lauzon-Charny, the son of the governor, Jean de Lauzon, who had been killed by the Iroquois the previous June 22. Attending the ceremony, as witnesses, were Paul de Rainville and Michel Baugis, both residents of Beauport. On August 18, 1664, Pierre and Anne decided to sell their farm, at Beauport, an area of 10 arpents, with a small barn and a cabin, six of them already under cultivation. The purchaser was Antoine Gaillou, an edgetool maker. The sale price was 300 livres. On the following August 25, they gave the buyer a receipt, on which it was written that, Michel still was owed 153 livres, 5 sols. Pierre had just discovered that, he was interested in buying or acquiring concessions and then reselling them later at a profit. On November 16, 1665, Pierre and Anne appeared together, at the cathedral of Quebec, with 16 other people to receive the sacrament of Confirmation from Msgr. de Laval.

- CHARLESBOURG It seems that during this era, Pierre and his wife obtained a concession from the Jesuit Fathers, on the occasion of a sale in 1671. On the first of June, 1666, the Nursing Sisters ceded, to the Mailloux couple, a concession planted in standing trees and located at Pointe de Levis, on the Lauzon coast, bordered on one side by Jean Guay. Then, on March 28, 1667, Mathurin Cardin, a resident of the Seigneurie of Notre-Dame-des-Anges, sold a concession at La Petite-Auvergne, to Pierre, for a price of 50 livres tournois. In December 1667, on the 10th, Pierre Mailloux resold his land, at La Petite-Auvergne, to Mathurin Renaud. The net profit was 10 livres. The censustakers, in the winter of 1667, reported that, in the Seigneurie of Notre-Dame-des-Anges, the Mailloux family were living neat Isaac Bedard. They had an arpent of land under cultivation and two other arpents, on the land bought, from Mathurin Cardin. In spite of all this, the Mailloux couple lacked any liquid assets. On January 23, 1669, they obtained 50 livres tournois from the Jesuits, as a true and loyal loan. On March 2, 1671, the Mailloux family decided to leave Charlesbourg. Elie Jean dit Godon acquired their farm, of 40 arpents. Seven arpents were cleared by pickaxe, with a cabin and shed, 20 feet long and ready for a roof. The buyer offered 400 livres and 20 livres for a pot of wine. The notarized act states that, Pierre had obtained this concession from the Jesuits, without indicating the day or the year. Where did the Mailloux family then go to live ?

- THE ILE d'ORLEANS On May 31, 1671, the notary, Gilles Rageot, was summoned to the parlor of the Nursing Sisters of Quebec, to settle the terms of a concession to Pierre Mailloux. Five nuns were present to ratify this donation of three arpents, in frontage, on the north side, in Argentenay. It was a concession of standing trees, with hunting and fishing rights. The conditions were : to build a house there ; to clear two arpents of land, in one year ; to pay an annual rent of 20 sols per arpent of frontage and 12 deniers for the cens. Obviously, for a son of a merchant and a daughter of a doctor, Pierre and Anne needed a lot of courage to begin again with nothing, to work a farm, in standing wood, on the Ile d'Orleans. The following autumn, on November 24, the nuns ceded another arpent and a half, of frontage, located along the first Mailloux land and with the same conditions. Note that, the three arpents of frontage ceded were not in Argentenay but in Lirec, the parish of Sainte Famille. This is why Msgr. de Laval, through his representative, Father Dudouyt, gave Pierre a new deed, on July 7, 1673. Elie Jean decided not to keep the land bought from Pierre Mailloux, at Charlesbourg. Perhaps it was poor quality. Gilles Rageot acquired it, on February 12, 1674, for 80 livres. The Mailloux family did not seem very pleased with life on the island. On January 22, 1676, the notary, Paul Vachon went to their house, to draw up a contract of sale, to Martin Guerard for their property. The latter promised to pay 150 livres, in 15 days. The neighbor, Germain Lepage, was not there as witness but, his brother, Louis, was. Martin signed with initials. To where did the Mailloux couple move their household this time ?

- CITY OF QUEBEC To live in Quebec was to spend one's days in the capital near the businesses, the shops, the training schools, the diocese, the Hotel-Dieu, in short, where the elite of society held forth. Were Pierre and his family living on the island, in 1677 ? Probably not. On December 20, of that year, Anne and Pierre bought " from Antoine Cade, merchant and from Charlotte de La Combe, a piece of land with 30 feet in frontage on rue du Sault-au-Matelot and to a depth as far as the boundary line of the widow of Eustache Lambert adjoining on one side Michel Lecour. The notarized act did not note the presence of a house on this lot...Pierre promised to pay 240 livres tournois or an annual rent of 12 livres. In the census, of 1681, Pierre, for the first time said that, he was a sabotier (a maker and seller of wooden shoes-clogs). He lived in the Lower Town with his five children, who were between the ages of 6 and 19. On June 16, 1681, Marie Laurence, Eustache Lambert's widow, offered the Mailloux couple a concession of 4 arpents, in frontage, by 40 deep, located near the land of the landlady and that of Andre Bergeron, on the Lauzon coast. She kept for herself, the right to fish, on the frontage. There was a small house which, she would have removed when it " seems good to her". The rent was 20 sols per arpent, of frontage. Pierre annulled this contract seven years later, on June 20, 1688, in the presence of Gabriel Lambert, Nicolas Verieul and Pierre Asselin. Pierre, living on Rue du Sault-au-Matelot, was always looking for a good land deal. On August 8, 1683, Claude Bermen, Sieur de La Martiniere, the guardian of the minor children of Jean de Lauzon, offered Mailloux a concession located, today, in the territory of Saint-Romuald. It had 6 arpents, in frontage, to a depth of 40, with the right to fish and hunt. In the act of acquisition, signed by Notary Rageot, the seller admitted that, he had not found a tenant because, the cens and rents were high, 12 livres, 6 sols. He ceded the fishing for 7 livres, 6 sols and 3 deniers. Pierre was trying to make this acquisition profitable. However, on October 10, 1687, he relinquished the said land, its buildings and rights of way. Does the proverb " a rolling stone stone gathers no moss ", apply here ? Perhaps !

- WITH THE CHANGE OF THE CENTURY From the point of finances, the Mailloux family, in the second generation, held their own. However, Our Ancestor, Pierre Mailloux, had many difficulties making ends meet, in his business. On August 22, 1691, he decided to sell to his son-in-law, Jean Dubois, half of his property on the Rue du Sault-au-Matelot, a neighbor to Vital Caron and Claude Baillif, an architect. The price asked was 800 livres. His property was worth 1,600 livres. It was said, in the document : " until the return of the said Mailloux from the said voyage which he hopes to make to France in the present." To see their native country again was the dream of many a colonist. Note that, the contract was never signed by Notary Rageot. Even though the heart, of a parent, seems to be a bottomless sea, their children are often unaware that, their pockets can be likened to a sieve. The Mailloux understood that, those responsible for life needed material aid. They helped them. This is what is implied in the act of donation which Pierre and Anne made to Pierre and Jean, on April, 2, 1699. They asked them to continue to help out. On the eve of the last summer, of the dying century, on Thursday, June 11, 1699, Pierre Mailloux was buried, at Quebec, in the presence of his family and the witnesses recorded in the registry : Jean Dubreuil, a sexton ; Jacques Michelson, a shoemaker and sexton. The pastor, Francois Dupre, presided at the funeral ceremony. Anne Delaunay did not long survive her husband, on the road to the Here After. She was buried, on Sunday, December 12, 1700, during the first winter of the new century. Pierre and Anne had been partners, in the trials and joys, on earth. They were partners again, in the eternal glory.

LaForest, Thomas J., Our French-Canadian Ancestors Volume 29- Chapter 14- Page 139 
Mailloux dit Desmoulins Pierre
 
112 PRDB has st-pierre de brie-sous-matha, ev. saintes, saintonge (ar. st-jean-d'angely, charente-maritime) Mailloux dit Desmoulins Pierre
 
113 Il demeurait au moulin de Gachet à Pissotte avant son départ pour le Canada. Manseau Jacques
 
114 Une plaque commémorative a été érigée à Cry-sur-Armançon. Marcoux Claude
 
115 Charles Amador, who became a priest, served in several local parishes and taught at the Quebec Seminary.
Birthplace also seen as Bouset, France. 
Martin Charles Amador, priest
 
116

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If you find verifiable errors, please let me know. I welcome all additions, particularly Sharrow/Charron surnames in the Detroit River area of Michigan/Ontario which will link to relatives in the tree (please be sure that your information includes

Digitized photos of ancestors, biographies, land records, wills and probate records are also wanted.

Please do not send files with sanitized records -- that is, names like: LIVING SURNAME with no first names, dates or locations. These are not useful genealogical records!

Send information or queries to craig@sharrow.com
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When viewing the Polish ancestors, some surnames appear to display incorrectly unless you use a Central European font. 
Martin Judith
 
117 By Yolande St-Arneault
Échos génealogiques
Société de Généalogie des Laurentides
Volume XVII, #1, spring 2001
Translated by Lorelei Maison Rockwell, May 2002
Lorelei@Kennedy-Rockwell.com
This insignificant historical person nevertheless gave his name to the Plains of Abraham and Abraham's Coast. He was one of the trivial actors in the history of New France. An obscure character. An antihero. Paradoxically he gave his name in perpetuity to two properties that are part of Champlain's city.
On 15 February 1649 the little colony was in shock. Abraham Martin, age 60, a companion of Champlain and the head of a large and respected family was thrown in prison. The accusation: he had forfeited the honor of a strapping young girl of 16 [translator's note: statutory rape?]. Certainly it would be said that this old pig Abraham had debauched a fine 'young thing.' Three months later his wife gave him his ninth, and last, child.
Abraham Martin arrived in Quebec in the summer of 1617--probably making the voyage in the same ship as Louis HÉBERT. His family accompanied him: his wife Marguerite LANGLOIS [translator's note: Jette[1] gives their date of marriage c 1620 'in France'], her sister Francoise and Francoise's husband Pierre DESPORTES. This couple would have a daughter Helene, who would become the goddaughter of Quebec's founder. This same Helene would marry, as a second husband, Medard Chouart des Groseillers, the colorful explorer, fur trader and co-founder of the Hudson's Bay Company.
From his arrival onwards our Abraham MARTIN was in no hurry to disappear into nameless obscurity in the tiny world of the first colony.
Years later historians found his trail in the local, popular culture where his name was inscribed--first in the topography of Quebec under the French regime and then in notarial records making reference to Abraham's Coast.
A street named Abraham appears in a 1734 Quebec City map. Then, later, we find his name preserved in reports of the celebrated historic battles of 1759 and 1760. There were accounts signed by English officers and published in London as well as in the journal of New France's Chevalier de Levi.
The name Abraham MARTIN also appears in the controversial will Champlain signed in November 1635, two months before his death. Canadian history was young then and still in the making. The original will was not discovered until 324 years later, in August 1959 to be exact, by the historian and archivist Olga Jurgens, and published in 1963. In his will, Champlain "gives to Abraham and his wife 600 livres with the charge of using it to clear land in this country of New France." The founder also gave 600 livres to Marguerite, daughter of Abraham, "to support her in marrying a man of this country--New France--and no other."
The original will stated clearly that if Champlain should leave little or nothing in goods and Quebec properties to his widow, he wanted her to have the largest part of his inheritance in France.
In 1863 the historian, J. B. A. Ferland began to follow the track of the great curate Thomas Maguire. M. Maguire 'suggested that a part of the Plains had belonged to an individual by the name of Abraham."
In consulting civil registers for the parish of Notre Dame de Quebec during the time of the French regime, Ferland found only one person with the first name Abraham: Abraham Martin, called l'Ecossais [the Scot], who was shown as a royal pilot. He was our man.
In 1635 Abraham Martin accepted, from the Company of New France, a land grant of 12 arpents in Quebec. Another parcel of 20 arpents was added 10 years later. The combined land was well-situated in the upper town, but north of the present Grand Allée, on what was at that time called St-Genevieve Hill. For this reason Abraham Martin's land should not be confused with the Plains today.
What may also be seen from this little history is that should a man take his animals down to the Charles River to drink, in taking the road of descent he would come to the Coast of Abraham.
We discover in a notarial act dated 16 October 1675 the name Charles-Amador Martin, only surviving son of Abraham. Priest and co-inheritor, Charles-Amador cedes to the religious order of Ursulines 32 arpents of land situated in a place called Claire-Fontaine in exchange for the sum of 1200 livres, a small fortune at the time.
In the decisive battles of 1759 and 1760 French and English soldiers played a prominent role in insuring that the topographical name Abraham was engraved in the historical record.
The Chevalier de Levi mentioned in his journal on 19 July 1759 that the English "have four ships passing above the town and in consequence will be able to send dispatches via the Heights of Abraham and as far as Cap Rouge."
On the same day the troops of Wolfe and Montcalm clashed, 13 September 1759, a Captain in an English regiment, John Knox, wrote in his journal, later published under the title The Siege of Quebec, that once landed at the foot of the cliff, they did not stop, "till we comes to the Plains of Abraham."
Another English officer, John Montresor, wrote a book published in London and titled The General Battle of the Heights of Abraham.
If the land of Abraham Martin was not contiguous with the present Plains, the battle of 1759, on the other hand, really and truly was fought on the Plains of Abraham and on the ancient property of Abraham Martin.
The great historic battle raged all over the upper town. The French and English troops had taken position on the cliff as far as the Sainte-Foy Road and Parliamentary Hill--today approximately up to Rue Belvedere.
Reckoning from the beginning of the English regime, local cartography considerably expanded the dimensions of the Coast of Abraham and the Plains. Abraham's hillside covered the continuation west of St. Genevieve's Hill up to Rue Suéte which leads to St-Foye at Lorette.
Regarding the Plains of Abraham, more often called the "Heights of Abraham," the topographical name usually appeared on maps designating a large part of the upper town outside the ramparts. It was not until 1879 that city maps delineated exactly as it is known today.
In 1908 the federal government created Battlefield Park. But for the people of Quebec it will always be the Plains of Abraham or simply the Plains. An affectionate name. A popular and gratuitous tribute to the earliest setters of the country.
Each time has its own history. After the Conquest, the British Empire could not abandon the location of its victory to anonymity. The place name had to be in accord with the importance of the event.
Historians Jacques Mathieu and Alain Beaulieu advance an interesting theory in their monumental history of the Plains published in 1993 by Septentrion. For them, the 1759 conqueror preserved the popular name believing that it referred to the Biblical patriarch. They write: For people of the Protestant faith, strongly imbued with Biblical tradition, the designation "Abraham" makes use of a major symbolic power. The conquerors could not fail to see themselves in the image of the great prophet. It was in this way, through a series of misunderstandings, that a colorless colonist had his name immortalized. History has kept the secret!
Sources: "Les Plaines d'Abraham, le culte de l'idéal" de Jacques Mathieu et Eugen Kedl; le dictionnaire biographique du Canada, tome 1; Les Cahiers des Dix, no 42; la Revue d'histoire de l'Amérique français, no XVII.
Text publié dans le Soleil du dimanche le 4 mai 1997 et ecrit part Louis Guy Lemieux. Voir Internet
Abraham Martin is Yolande St-Arneault's ancestor through 3 of his daughters: Anne, Marie, and Marguerite [more available here].

Pilote de bateau sur le Saint-Laurent Note:
Reconnu comme l'un des premiers 47 colons de Québec, Fondateur de la Nouvelle-France.
Arrived in Quebec 1619, passe en France apres la prise de Quebec par Kirke 24- 07-1629, revenue a Quebec 1633 ou 1634; maitre pilote [MSGCF (129): 162-164, T-27, DBC I 506-507, J.J.]
This is the Abraham Martin who was granted the land that has become known
historically as the "Plains of Abraham", the grant coming from Adrien
Duchesne, a physician and interpreter in the service of the Jesuits.
Note:
Ency. Can. Goelier of Canada 1972. Vol. 6, p. 394. Martin, Abraham, pioneer settler; b. about 1587, in Scotland - hence his nickname of L'Ecossais; d. at Quebec, 8 Sep 1664. He came to Canada some time after 1614, probably in 1619 or 1620, and was for many years in the service of the Company of One Hundred Associates. He was one of the few French settlers to remain in Quebec after its surrender to the English in 1628. The battle of the Plains of Abraham was fought in 1759. On the heights of Quebec he acquired a large tract of land - now known as the Plains of Abraham - which perpetuates his name. He became a pilot and in 1647 was named a Royal pilot. In 1613 he married Marguerite Langlois; they had several daughters and on son, Charles Amador, who became a priest, served in several local parishes and taught at the Quebec Seminary. Martin is thought to have been the father of another daughter by a previous marriage.
Note:
Ref: Roy, P.G., "Abraham Martin die l'Ecossais et les Plaines d'Abraham,"Bulletin des Recherches historiques, sep 1928; Thwaites, R. G. (ed), The Jesuit Relations, Vol. 32, Cleveland, 1898; Massicotte, E. Z. "Au Sujet d'Anne Martin, Fille d'Abraham Martin dit l'Ecossais, et Femme de Jean Cote," Bulletin des Recherches historiques, April 1922.
Note:
Les Relations Des Jesuites: Vol. 32, P. 312. Abraham Martin (nicknamed L'Ecossias, "the Scotchman,") was born in 1589; he came to Canada in 1614. In the previous year, he had m. Marguerite Langlois; but it is not known whether she came with him, or later. His famiy lived with him after 1620, and they were among the few French colonists who remained in Quebec after its surrender to the English in 1628. Martin was for many years an engage of the Hundred Associates, who granted him lands on the heights of Quebec, afterward known as the "Plains of Abraham." In 1647, he is mentioned as "royal pilot." He died in September, 1664, leaving a numerous family; one of his daughters married the explorer De Grosilliers.
Note:
Notes from Les Arseneau, 19 Apr 1996: Surnamed the "Scotchman" arrived from France on the sailboat "Le Sallemande" at Tadoussac on 30 Aug 1620. He was accompanied by his wife, name not known, and his daughter, Anne." ACGS #4530.
Also, Les suggests that A.M. was born in Dundee, SCT, but cannot provide documentation.
Note:
Notes from Dot Drake du Canada, pg 506, says that Abraham was born in France in 1589, was a pilot, came to Quebec with his wife, her sister Francaise and husband Pierre Desportes. He could have had Scot ancestors, or he could have been in the military in France and been given "l'ecossais" as a nickname or dit name as was very common. Or, he may have been a deserter or belonged to an illegal organization. Or, possibly it was his father who was given that name. Note that Mary Queen of Scots died in 1587, 2 years before Abraham was born. Could his father have been involved with a group trying to free Mary,and fled to France when they were discovered? This is a tantalizing question which begs all kinds of speculation. Martin could be a form of Scots surname, but it is also a big name in France. So, who knows.Perhaps you should post your question to the 2 news groups dealing with French/Canadian subjects. Try the Medieval group too--there are some pretty knowledgeable participants there.

Parents also seen as Father: Abraham MARTIN b: Abt 1571 in France Or, , , Scotland
Mother: Sarah AUCHINLECK b: Abt 1568 in Dundee, Angus, Scotland

Three other childen born in about 1650, 1652, 1654 - probably infant deaths. 
Martin dit l'Écossais Abraham
 
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Masse Francoise Charlotte
 
119 Fille a marier Métayer Marie
 
120 Metis Michel dit Taillon Elisabeth Agnes
 
121 Roger Durand Geneology states that she was born in Bonsecours a l'Islet. Michel dit Taillon Elisabeth Agnes
 
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Michelsen Anne
 
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Michelsen Maren
 
124 Fille à marier Morisseau Marguerite Madeleine
 
125 About that time our Uncle Christian, Dad's blind brother, came to staywith us during the summer. He was a musician and played the violinbeautifully. He also played the mandolin. Laura had a mandolin andhe gave us lessons. We sat out on the hillside and got one hourlessons. We learned to play trios. He the violin, Laura on the guitarand me on the mandolin.
Uncle Christian was three years older than Dad. He always wanted tosit up with their mother at night when she was knitting socks for thefamily. He felt sorry for her. He begged her to teach him to knit.She discouraged him because he was blind but he insisted. She finallygave him the needles. I think they used five needles, size three andmade of steel. He felt her fingers and could determine how she did itand learned to knit the most intricate patterns. I'm sure he was abig help to her doing the family knitting. He knitted his whole life. After he came to America he went to blind school in Janesville, Wi.He learned many crafts and finished high school in three years. Heloved to play the violin and played beautifully. He loved music andmemorized fourteen hundred songs. During the first world war hecorrected German government papers in braille for the U.S. He wouldsay "Now I must work for Uncle Sam".
We lived back in the hills for ten years. Of course one of thehighlights was Uncle Christian's visit. He told us much aboutscience, medieval history and music. He could read and write elevenlanguages in braille. When he was bored at home he would learnanother language. He had written the entire New Testament in brailleas well as a geometry book and it was used in the high school heattended. In this day and age he would have been more appreciated.He made his own living making string hammocks, bead baskets, brooms,etc. I loved to lie in one of his hammocks in the aspen trees outback and read. So peaceful to hear the leaves rustle and spend timereading.

From a family story written by Jennie Nelson, stepdaughter of JohnNelson

Christian died June 7, 1926. Death instant from a heart attack.Information was provided by NP Sorensen of Luck. Death record listedMarie as his wife. From death record at Polk County Court House. 
Nelson Christian Wilhelm
 
126 James was an active citizen and businessman of Cushing and a member ofthe then very popular Cushing Band which took place in the little"Brenholdt Woods' adjacent to the town, which in our country'sbicentennial year became the Brenholdt Memorial Park. James, at 92,was present at its dedication on July 11, 1976 and was honored as theonly living child of those 1870 Danish immigrants. Nelson James Peter
 
127 The following is a letter written by Johane Nelson to her husbandChristian Torkelson

Cushing the 18th of September, 1889
Darling Husband
I received your dear and welcome letter yesterday and I will try togather my thoughts together and answer you Darling mine. Our Papa wasburied Sunday forenoon and there was quite a few here I think but Ididn't see half of them. He was buried up by the Tamarack Church.
Many of them that saw him while he was lying here said that they werejust as sure as anything that he was poisoned and it looked like ittoo. He swelled up awfully especially his breast and the blood justran from him. We had to set something under him but in his face helooked as though he was asleep so kind and gentle he looked.
I am glad Darling that you don' t work down there. Petersen is thereand he says that if he can stay there his month out he shant be therelonger. They are so rough that there can't be any decent people thereat all. He says that if they say anything they run the risk ofgetting a piece of wood in the head and last week some of the fellowswent to a farmer living somwhere around there and said they were goingto hang him but they didn't, they beat him almost to death instead.Was not that terrible. They must be perfect divils that will do suchas that.
Peters have a big girl now. She was born the evening after Papa diedand Christine is well after the circumstance.
The plush shall be black if you buy any and I have to have somethingfor my head too but that can be til you come home Darling and I hopethat won't be long now.
I haven't gotten over my toothache and earache yet. My head is sosore I can't stand to stir hardly.
Darling mine I guess I must stop now for this time with hope that Ishall see you soon. I am longing so much for you my beloved it seemsso long since I saw you last. Baby is well and growing good and he issuch a dear little boy. Goodbye dear love and come soon or if youdon't come write, but I hope you will come Darling. Goodbye from yourloving wife Tina T.

Here is Christian's Song of Goodbye to our Father and I hope you likeit.

(This was followed by a song written in Danish which translates asfollows.)

"Farewell to Our Father"

Farewell our good Father dear. Your silence now is incredible.
From life's difficulties and troubles you have now found rest.
The world's needs and difficulties you no longer perceive.
But in your slumber, quiet and sweet all earthly sorrow is forgotten.
O Death, your heavy bitter day, how dark it is to behold.
And the heavy blow from your hand we may all well dread.
Because nothing can continue for you when God's commands are given,
then all must wither and come to an end.
Each bond is torn by grief.
Oh that you our Father dear will no longer be with us. 
Nelson Johane Martiene
 
128 When I was about three years old my Mom married her best friend'sbrother, John Nelson. (Jens to his family). When his parents cameover from Uland, Denmark they didn't have enough money to bring thewhole family so they left Jens and his blind brother Christian Williambehind. When Jens and Christian were 18 and 15 years old the folkshad enough money saved up to bring them over to the USA. One canimagine what it was like for young Jens (15) and his blind brothergetting to New York and on to St. Paul. Since Christian was blind hewas allowed to go home to his folks. But Jens had to stay in St. Paulto make his own living. He knew no English so went to back yards andpointed to the wood pile, to indicate he would make wood for a meal.He probably had money enough for a room. He got a job washing dishesin a restaurant. He was tired of fending for himself so he joined theArmy when he was old enough and was stationed at Fort Snelling.

From a story wrtten by Jennie Nelson, stepdaughter of John 
Nelson John
 
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Newall Robert
 
130 Barbra /Nicolajsen/ Nicolajsen Barbra
 
131 The first "Perrizo" to arrive in the New World was the soldier Jean (John). His last name was generally written Delpue dit Parizo, (note: the French "dit" means "called"), and his descendants have adopted variants of both names, the first usually being Dalpé, and the second has become generally Perrizo in the U.S.A., but often Pariseau in Canada. By tradition he was born in the shade of the old cathedral of Rodez in South-central France. However, a search of the records there was unsuccessful, and he is more likely to have been born in one of the many villages of this diocese (in 1648). Rodez has one of the dozen or so great Gothic cathedrals of France and was an important trading center in the Middle Ages and later. The most usual spelling of the name there was Delpuech
dit Parisot. Parisot is the name of a small village in the neighboring county of Tarn-and-Garonne - and possibly that is the origin of the family.

By 1664, Jean must have moved to the La Rochelle area (south-west coast of France), since much of the recruiting of the Carignan-Salières regiment took place there, where the Garonne river reaches the Bay of Biscay. In 1665 he arrived in Canada as part of Captain Le Frédière's company, for the defense of Montreal. They landed at Quebec 18 June 1665 and spent the winter there, and went on to Montreal the following Spring.

After his discharge in 1668, he married Renée Lorion and took up farming on the island of Montreal. Their first child Jeanne was baptized at Repentigny (1675) and the seven others at Pointe-aux-Trembles. As the History of Varennes continues: The 31 March 1679, Jean obtained the land and residence of the inheritance Belestre, which included the whole of the bottom end of the Isle of Montreal. In 1681, he had six arpents under cultivation, one ox and one rifle which he would soon need.

It is known that the Five Nations (of the Iroquois) had taken up the tomahawk at the conclusion of the Franco-English wars. Particularly in the period 1689-92, the region suffered a whole chain of raids, which accounted for the lives of many of the
colonists. The 2nd July 1690, the Iroquois arrived at the River of the Prairies (North side of Montreal Island), and twenty five inhabitants of Pointe-aux-Trembles assembled to meet the enemy under the command of M. de Columbet. Jean Delpué
was in the group as was Pierre Payet called Saint-Amour, ancestor of the Payette family of Varennes. The fatal defense took place in the fort of the Coulee Grou. The combat was deadly. 30 indians remained on the battlefield, and 15 Canadians perished: 9 fell in the battle - including Jean Delpué - the others died in captivity (burned by the Indians).

The following year, 9 July 1691, Renée Lorion married Jean LeTellier at Pointe aux Trembles. However, she was immensely saddened a month later when two of her sons, Jean and Nicolas, were drowned in the St. Lawrence. [Note: Tanguay suggests that Jean died in 1701, not 1691, so Renée's sadness may have been at two separate times - not a great start to her second marriage though! Jean's birthday is probably wrong. Renée married a third time in 1706, still only 49 years old]

The children of Jean who established themselves at Varennes were:
- the oldest, Jeanne, who married the Breton, Jean Quintin in January 1695.
- Francois, who was baptized in February 1677, and was married in August
1699 to Marie-Catherine Hayet dit Malo, daughter of Jean, the first Canadian of that name (see more below). They raised six children all baptized in Varennes.
- At 29 years old, [more probably 18], in June 1705, Catherine married Michel
Le Gardeur, the oldest son of the Sieur Le Gardeur d'Alenceau (Alençon), a family
of Norman origin, already in Canada for several generations.
- Pierre married Suzanne Gareau in October 1716.
Sometime during the nineteenth century, a rough stone cairn was erected to commemorate the 1690 "battle" of Coulee Grou (there may have been an earlier memorial also). There is a picture of the cairn in an old history book of Montreal.

-----

Translated from: Drouin Volume III

Jean Delpue dit Parisot was killed in combat against the Iroquois 2 July 1690,
and a monument to him (& others) was erected at the place of the battle in
Point-aux-Trembles by the "Commission of Historical Sites & Monuments of
Canada". The inscription on the face of the monument is as follows:
"The 2 July 1690, M. de Colombet leading 25 men was attacked by 100 Iroquois
near here: he was killed with 9 of his soldiers, as well as 30 enemies. Jean
Grou, owner of the farm where the battle took place, and three of his
companions were captured by the savages and burned alive. Joseph Lajeunesse,
descendant of Grou, donated the land & stone for this monument."

The register of Point-aux-Trembles of Montreal, dated 2 November 1694,
completed the history of that battle. The text is as follows: The 2 July
1690, at the end of the island near the "coulee" of Jean Grou, the Iroquois
killed the Sr (Sieur?) Colombe, former lieutenant, Joseph de Montenon, Sr de
la Rue, which the enemies burned the same day behind the fort of LaChenaye,
Guillaume Richar dit Lafleur, our lieutenant of Militia, Jean Jalot, our
surgeon.....Jean Delpue dit parisot, Joseph carrier dit Larose, Jean Raynau
dit Planchar burned by the Oneidas (one of the Iroquois nations) with Jean
Grou, calm & easy-going in the presence of father Millet, Jean Baudoin, son,
Pierre Masta and an employee of great Bauchant named ...Pierre Payet dit
St-Amours was taken in the attack and held prisonner the 2 July 1690, he was
given to the Oneidas who let him live as well as *demanding of us,father
Millet,during the month of February 1691 in return for letting him live*(not
sure if this is correct-LH). St-Amours returned to the fort in 1693. Since
the Iroquois were greatly feared, the bodies of those who had been killed were
quickly buried at the same place that the massacre had occured; it was not
until 2 Nov 1694 that their bones were transported to the cemetary, where they
were buried in the presence of all the settlers.

*Jean Delpe was a soldier of the LaFreydiere Company, Carignan Regiment. 
Parisot Jean Delpé dit
 
132 Grandpa (James Peterson), whose father was Peter Clemens leftShelland, Denmark when he was 21 years to come to America leavingbehind his father, a stepmother, and two sisters, Maria (Ane MariePetersdatter) and Christine. He planned to work here and send moneyback to them so they could come. He was a private coachman in Chicago. It was customary in Denmark, when families left there to come here,that women sold their garments at an auction. They usually gottogether with other families and had a public auction. The idea wasto make the luggage lighter for traveling. Grandpa sent money forMaria first. Maria sold her clothes with some family named Brendholtand then married their son the next day. So she gave the moneyGrandpa had sent to Christine. Finally all the parents came andsettled in Cushing. Christine, Grandpa's sister, went to Racine,Wisconsin to work and was killed by a runaway horse.

"When I was a Kid" written by Bernyce Peterson Schleith 
Pedersdatter Ane Lucie Marie
 
133 James owned the 80 acres directly south of Christen Brenholt. He wasalso known as Jens according to the deed in the Polk County CourtHouse when he sold the farm in 1919. Peterson James
 
134 Duluth Ward 7 Pickthorn Charles
 
135 Fille du Roi



[charron.marie-therese.1716.st.suplice.ged]

age 70 years
age 18 years
age 55 years
age 30 yearsMarie-Catherine Plat-Peillate (var. of names Pillat, Pillar, Pilet, Plate, Pillard.)
She was born 1651 at Notre Dame de Cognes, Rochelle, France.
She 1m. Nicolas-Pierre Charron 19 Oct 1665 in Montréal . They had 12 children.
She 2m. Sebastien Brisson in 1709.

Marie-Catherine arrived in Québec as a "Daughter of the King", sent to Montréal to marry one of the many males needing a wife She was furnished with a small casket of cash and a small supply of household items. As she and Nicolas-Pierre had 12 children, they apparently took to heart the French King's admonition to multiply and furnish more new French-Canadians to settle the new French territory.

BIRTH: May have been born in Notre Dame, La Rochelle, de-Cogne, France (per Bernice [Gladys Sharrow] Hackney's genealogy records)

===================
Pilliar-Pillat, Catherine Sexe: Féminin
Naissance : 1646 à Notre-Dame de La Rochelle, Aunis, FR
Décès : 23 juillet 1717
Inhumation : 23 juillet 1717 à Québec, Québec
Or Pillat, or Plat, or Pilet, or Pilliar.
NAME : "LA DESCENDANCE DE PIERRE CHARON" BY EMILE FALARDEAU-1981
BIRTH: RESCENSEMENT OF 1681;REPERTOIRE DDES ACTES DE BAPTEME, MARIAGE,
SEPULTURE ET DES RECENSEMENTS DU QUEBEC ANCIEN (PRDH) BY H. CHARBONEAU AND J. LEGARE VOL. 6
BURIAL: TANGUAY; VOL 3; P220

====================================================
If you find verifiable errors, please let me know. I welcome all additions, particularly Sharrow/Charron surnames in the Detroit River area of Michigan/Ontario which will link to relatives in the tree (please be sure that your information includes

Digitized photos of ancestors, biographies, land records, wills and probate records are also wanted.

Please do not send files with sanitized records -- that is, names like: LIVING SURNAME with no first names, dates or locations. These are not useful genealogical records!

Send information or queries to craig@sharrow.com
------------------------------------------------
When viewing the Polish ancestors, some surnames appear to display incorrectly unless you use a Central European font. 
Pillat dit Pillard Marie Catherine
 
136 PINARD, LOUIS, master surgeon, donné of the Jesuits, surgeon-major at Trois-Rivières; b. c. 1633, son of Jean Pinard and Marguerite Gaignier of Notre-Dame de La Rochelle; d. 1695.

He came to Canada about 1648 as a surgeon and Jesuit donné, and left for France again 23 Aug. 1650 with the surgeon François Gendron to complete his surgical studies. A master surgeon upon his return in 1656 and established at Trois-Rivières, he immediately began to exercise his art for the benefit of the garrison. In 1666 Jacques Dubois was employed by him as a surgeon's aid. Pinard is said to have taken part in the expedition to Hudson Bay in 1685 along with the surgeon Jacques Meneux dit Châteauneuf. Around 1690 he became surgeon-major of the town of Trois-Rivières. His son Claude was also to become a surgeon and undoubtedly began his studies under his father's direction; he did his apprenticeship, however, under Jean Demosny at Quebec. In 1692 Pinard was the agent of Claude Deshaies-Gendron, and distributed in the region around Trois-Rivières "the remedies which M. Gendron sent to Canada for charity."

On 11 June 1657 Louis Pinard had signed before the notary Séverin Ameau* a contract of marriage with Marie-Madeleine Hertel, daughter of Jacques Hertel and Marie Marguerie. On 30 Nov. 1680 at Champlain he took as his second wife Marie-Ursule Pépin. Each of his wives bore him six children.

Pinard does not seem to have had a very peaceful career: we find him engaged in legal disputes over money matters with a great number of citizens of Trois-Rivières and Cap-de-la-Madeleine. In particular he had quarrels with Michael Leneuf Du Hérisson. Moreover he was in rivalry with the surgeon Michel Gamelain, whose competition be feared and who later became father-in-law to his son, the surgeon Claude Pinard. Nevertheless Louis Pinard seems to have been held in esteem, since he was for a long time one of the settlers' syndics, a churchwarden, and procurator of the church.

In 1670 he settled down on his seigneury of L'Arbre-à-la-Croix at Champlain (seigneury of La Pinardière). There he engaged in agriculture and the fur trade. Later we find him at Batiscan, where he was buried 12 Jan. 1695.

Gabriel Nadeau

AJTR, Greffe de Séverin Ameau, 11 juin 1657. JJ (Laverdière et Casgrain), 143. Jug. et délib. Ahern, Notes pour l'histoire de la médecine, 441– 44. Raymond Douville, "Chirurgiens, barbiers-chirurgiens et charlatans de la région trifluvienne sous le régime français," Cahiers des Dix, XV (1950), 118– 21.

http://www.biographi.ca/009004-119.01-e.php?&id_nbr=527&interval=50&&PHPSESSID=3jhedvp7l8h1in7gojao345e47 
Pinard Louis
 
137 On 27 April 1651, at about 7:00 at night , Nicolas Pinel and his son, Gilles, were attacked in their spot by 2 Iroquois who thought they could take them alive.
Boisverdun shot without injuring them. Master Nicolas and his son ran for their lives down hill. The Iroquois were joined by others around the house of Nopce. They fired a round of arquebuse at the door of the house. At night the dogs never ceased barking at the cote de Ste-Genevieve.

Les Journal des Jesuits, p. 151

NICOLAS PINEL ESCAPPED ONCE FROM THE IROQUOIS BUT NOT TWICE

In an era where Acadia lacked arms, it was not rare to see Seigneurs or rich merchants of this region to go to France to raise troops, of farmers and of workers. Nicolas Pinel was precisely solicited during one of these recruitments, one organized in 1645 by Emmanuel Leborgne, of Acadia. Judging this matter as interesting, your ancestor signed himself up for going to work there for three years in Port Royal, to be a "sawyer of logs" and "carpenter of frames". He left in France his wife, Madeleine Maraut, and his children.

After the expiration of his engagement, Pinel didn`t return to France. He preferred to remain in New France, where he was assured to find work more easily than in his native country. Although, he was a carpenter, your ancestor submitted himself to the culture; he got for himself a grant of a concession close to the river of Cap-Rouge, and boldly cleared it, with the help of his son Gilles, who came to rejoin him from France.

The two men worked on their land, when in April 27 1651, they were "attacked in their tracks by two Iroquois who had thought they could take their lives. Boisverdun (a neighbour of Pinel) fired without injuring them. Master Nicolas and his son himself fearfully precipitated, downhill on the mountain to save themselves. ..". When all is said and done, your ancestor made a beautiful escape.
This clearly illustrates to us the atmosphere in which our ancestors lived. Continuously after that day, they were obliged to go to their work in the fields with a rifle on their shoulders. The rifle had become a tool as essential as a plough.
Finding this region of Cap-Rouge too infested with iroquois, Pinel was granted new land in a place more secure, Sillery. His wife, Madeleine Maraut then came join him in Canada, accompanied by his two children.

Nevertheless, Nicolas Pinel always kept the turned eyes towards Cap-Rouge. Also, as soon as it was relatively calm - he returned in to this region with his family. A new organization began, one day amongst the settlers. Since they were continually exposed to the Iroquois when they were isolated, they decided to organize the community in a manner so as to not ever find themselves alone. They worked together, and the fruits of their labour were equitably divided up. The idea was not bad one, and in the beginning things were encouraging.

Unfortunately, despite everything, Nicolas Pinel life came to a tragic end. Maybe he had relaxed for an instant in his vigilance, for in 1653 he was injured by a arquebuse (musket) ball, and he died a little later.

Translated from Drouin, pg 1813-1815 
Pinel dit Lafrance Nicolas
 
138 Fille à marier Pinet de Lachesnaye Marie
 
139 This page is centered on the genealogical line of JEAN-BAPTISTE MICHEL SAVIGNAC, who emigrated to New France around 1710, and it contains not only his direct descendents, but many other families associated by marriage or adoption. Jean-Baptiste had been born in the area of Bordeaux, France, around 1683. Upon arrival in Québec, he first settled in the area of Ile-Dupas, on the left bank of the St.Lawrence River, opposite the then very small town of Sorel. Within a few years he was living at the concession of Petite-Riviere on the Bayonne River near Berthier, where he farmed for the rest of his life. In 1719 he married a local girl, Marie-Anne Henault, and contemporary parish records indicate that they had eight children. Jean-Baptiste Savignac died in the summer of 1748 while on a trip to Montréal, and was buried there in the cemetery of Notre Dame. According to Fr. Ernest Savignac, family historian of the Pierre Savignac (1805-1882) branch of our family and author of "Pierre Savignac et ses descendants" (Oka, Québec, PQ, 1949), Jean-Baptiste Savignac was the first and only Savignac to emigrate from France to Canada (le primier et l'unique Savignac a émigrer de France au Canada) is the ancestor of all Canadian Savignacs (le pere commun de tous les Savignac du Canada). From him are descended almost every person in North America who bears the Savignac surname. (Yes, there are some who are not, but they are very few and far between.)
For detailed, sourced information on the Savignac, Vandal, Flynn, Meyers, Finn etc. lines, please see http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=dsavignac&id=I08982, which is a RootsWeb site.

David T. Savignac, http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/a/v/David-T-Savignac/index.html 
Savignac Jean Baptiste Michel
 
140 Anna married Andrew Imrick Nov. 5, 1900. they went to Bessemer,Michigan by horse and buggy for their honeymoon. It was very cold andshe got pnuemonia and almost died. Andrew worked in the mines from1900 to 1924. They came to the farm near Ashland in 1920 and he wentback to the mines for four years from Oct. to May. Andrew died fromblack lung disease Feb. 11, 1957, Anna's birthday. Anna died from agoiter operation on the day she was to come home from the operation. Sedlak Anna
 
141 Row 13, stone, 1 Sheridan James
 
142 Page: Record at St. Gregory the Great Ch., Oshawa, Ont.; LDS film # 1305881, item # 1, p. 52
Text: "The 15th of April, 1849 was baptized Mary, born the 14th of March; dau. of James Chardon and larty [Mary] McDonegh; sponsors: Edward McCabe, Bridget Maguire; by me J. B. Proulx." 
Sheridan Mary
 
143 Came to the US in 1871 Skaar Maren Olsdatter
 
144 Nels Peter Sorensen was born in Lyngsa, Denmark, April 20, 1857, andwas a little over 78 years old. He was united in marriage to AnnaChristena Hennrickson January 8, 1882. Mr. and Mrs. Sorensen leftDenmark March 16, 1887, to come to America, arriving in New York April5, 1887. They came direct to Polk County, settling in Laketown wherethey lived until 1912 when they moved to the village of Luck.

During the time Mr. Sorensen has lived in Luck he has plied his tradeas a carpenter. He either built or helped to build many of thebuildings and homes in the village.

From N.P. Sorensen's obituary. 
Sorenson Nels Peter
 
145 Fille du roi Talbot Anne
 
146 Fille du roi Taurey Martine
 
147 Fille du roi Tecier Geneviève
 
148 He arrived with the company LaFouille of the Carignan-Salières in Quebec City on 18 June 1665. While most soldiers in 1665 landed back in Europe in 1668, John decided to stay and settle in New France.

We can trace the journey of John through sales and purchases of land. On 23 June 1670 he purchased land in "The Pacaudière." On 19 January 1671 he sold land in St. Ours then bought another parcel May 23 1673. On 1 May 1676 he obtained a concession in the Lordship of Repentigny.

On 28 April 1677 he married Mary Gratiot in the presence of Jean-Baptiste Legardeur, squire Lord of the Lordship of Repentigny. From this union were born Anne-Marie, Catherine, Mary Magdalene and John the Baptist. Census 1681 has Jean with 1 rifle, 3 cattle and 6 arpents in value.

But misfortune strikes the young family in the fall of 1687 because it lost in the space of two months his daughters Mary Magdalene and Catherine, aged six and one year, his wife Mary aged twenty-four years and finally Christmas Eve, the child Jean-Baptiste, barely ten weeks. 
Tellier dit Lafortune Jean
 
149 Fille a marier Teste Marie
 
150 Fille a marier Thomas Marguerite
 

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