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51 Carignan regiment, Monteil co. Dessureau dit Bourguignon Dufresne François
 
52 DROUIN, ROBERT, pioneer on the Beaupré shore; b. 6 Aug. 1607 at Saint-Barthélemi du Pin-la-Garenne, Perche, son of Robert Drouin and Marie Dubois; buried 1 June 1685 at Château-Richer.

The date of Drouin's arrival in Canada is not known, but it is certain that he was here by 1636. In 1641 he already had a farm near the Rivière aux Chiens on the Beaupré shore, although he did not receive the concession for it until 17 April 1646. By his marriage with Anne Cloutier, which was celebrated 12 July 1637, he had three daughters; by his second marriage, with Marie Chapelier on 29 Nov. 1649, he had eight more children.

It is almost impossible to trace any French-Canadian genealogy without encountering Robert Drouin among the earliest ancestors. That would seem to us to be his greatest claim to fame. It is also to be noted that his marriage contract with Anne Cloutier (which preceded by nearly a year the religious ceremony), concluded 27 July 1636 in Robert Giffard's house and drawn up in the absence of a notary by Jean Guyon Du Buisson, senior, is the oldest marriage contract preserved in the original in Canada.

Honorius Provost

ASQ, Documents Faribault, 2; Seigneuries. JR (Thwaites). Jug. et delib.

http://www.biographi.ca/009004-119.01-e.php?&id_nbr=183&interval=50&&PHPSESSID=3jhedvp7l8h1in7gojao345e47 
Drouin Robert
 
53 !INDIVIDUAL GENERAL RESEARCH NOTES:
A review of archival materia, "Bulletin des Archinas de-la Saintonge,"
mentions a Bernard Durant who was linving n 1065 in Dampierre on the Bontonne,
about 8 miles Southeast of Doeuil.

!INDIVIDUAL GENERAL RESEARCH NOTES:
In 1952 Abbot Jean Marhais Priest of Doeuil furnished the following the
information, "First of all I must tell you that we no longer have the records
for the 1640 and following. Our records begin in 1679 and we lack some of
these too. I searched and found the name Durand in a number of baptisms,
marriages and burials, in particular two deaths which could considering the
ages have been brothers of your ancestor. Here are two exact copies. 'On this
day July 5, 1680, Nicolas Durnad died at the age of 39 and was buried in the
Cemetery here, the 6th of the month by the undersigned priest, (Gaultier,
Priest of Doeuil).' and 'On this day, February 13, 1681, Louis Durand age
45 died and was buried by the undersigned priest, (Gaultier, Priest of
Doeuil).' These records also indicated that Nicolas Durand and Ragegande
Beuray had a child, baptised Jehan on 11/22/1679. His godparents were Jehan
Girault and Elizabeth Ray. There is speculation that Nicolas came to Quebec as
there are records of a Nicolas Durand in Quebec in 1672. 
Durand Louis
 
54 Metis Durand Marie Charlotte
 
55 Metis Durand dit Chartier Louis
 
56 Roger Durand Geneology dates Louis' death as occuring in 1741. Durand dit Chartier Louis
 
57 Jean Durand was born in 1640, the son of Louis and Madeleine Malvand at Doeuil-sur-le- Mignon, St. Onge, France. The contract he signed to come to Canada to serve as a colonist for three years, states he was about 20 years old. He was to receive passage to and from Canada, board and room and 75 livres per year, payable at the end of each year.

He sailed from LaRochelle on "Les Armes d Amsterdam" at the beginning of April, 1660 and arrived at Quebec the latter part of May. The three years of service was with Charles Gautier. His life, like all colonists during that period, was quite varied-- farming, fishing, lumbering, etc. It also included serving in the Militia, because during that time all colonists lived in constant fear of the Iroqouis indians. In fact, Pierre Pinelle, his close friend and neighbor at Cap-Rouge, was murdered by them. The gun was a necessary adjunct to the plow.

It was during this period that the King of France decided to send young girls to Canada to become the wives of the colonists. They were called the "King's Daughters". On October 3, 1661, Jean Durand was engaged to one of these, Marie Fayette. They were to be married at a later date so we nearly had a King's daughter for an ancestor, however, before the wedding date arrived, they changed their minds, cancelled their engagement on January 12, 1662, and on her third engagement she married Nicholas Huot on July 24, 1662.

The next girl to capture Jean's heart was a young indian maiden who had been a refugee from the massacre of the Huron Missions by the Iroquois in 1648. This mission is known as Martyr's Shrine at Midland, Ontario. Her parents, Nicolas Arendanki and Jeanne Otri-ho-Andet lived at the parish mission of La Conception. Nicolas was one of the first Indian Chiefs to embrace the Christian religion and was well known to the missionaries Brebeuf Lalemant and Isaac Jogues and others who were martyred during the massacre. Nicolas was among the missing and no doubt suffered martyrdom like many others on that fateful day.

Jeanne, who had given birth to Catherine in 1648, was left destitute without any means of support. She, along with many others under the care of Father Chaumonot, fled to the Petun Indian Country, who were friends of the Hurons. This is described in great detail in the Jesuit Relations. The refugees that survived the hardships and starvation lived in exile until June 10, 1650, when some 300 christian hurons, with the help of the surviving missionaries and french soldiers, embarked in canoes for their long voyage to the Isle of Orleans. Those that survived the shipwrecks, hardships and accidents on the way arrived at the Isle of Orleans on July 23, 1650.

Catherine and her mother, who were among the survivors, were in poor health. During the summer of 1654, she was placed in the Ursuline convent of Quebec. Catherine remained under the tutelage of the nuns where she was taught not only the french language but also the french way of life. It was an objective of the Ursulines, the Jesuits, the Intendant, including the King, to educate the young indian maidens to eventually become suitable wives to the french colonists. Laval, the first bishop of Canada arrived june 16, 1659, and about two months later administered the sacrament of confirmation to a good number of young girls, french as well as indian. Catherine was among this group. The records show "confirmed at the Ursuline convent August 10, 1659 Catherine, Huron, age 10." It was only 3 years later, September 29, 1662, that Catherine and Jean Durand signed a contract to be married. The contract reads as follows:

"In the presence of Guillaume Andouart, secretary to the Administrative council, established at Quebec, by the King, notary in New France and the undersigned witnesses, here present Jean Durand dit Lafortune, son of Louis Durand and Madeleine Malvande, his father and mother from the burg of Deuil near the village of St Jean d'Angely in the Xaintonges, party of the first part, and Catherine Huronne.... party of the second part, both in the presence of their relatives and friends here named, Charles Gautier, Lord of Bois Verdun, Denis Duquet, a resident of Quebec, Jean Guyon, Pierre Pinel, Jean Drouart on behalf of the first part. Martin Boutet, representing and taking place of the father of the said Catherine Huronne, Dame Magdeleine de Chauvigny, widow of the late Charles de Gruel, while living the Baron of Pelletierie, Miss Thienette Deslprey, widow of the late Guillaume Guilmot, Esq., Lord Duplessis de Querbodo, Laurent Dubocq resident of this country have recognized and !
witnessed..............

Three days later, September 26, they exchanged their marraige vows in the parish church of Quebec, known today as the Basilica. The authentic copy of this document reads as follows:

In the year of our lord, one thousand six hundred and sixty two on the 26th day of September after engagement and publication of one bann (having given dispensation for the other two) read at mass the 24th of September and discovering no legitimate obstacle, I, Henri de Bernieres, priest of this parish, having questioned Jean Durand, son of Louis Durand and Madeleine Malvande, father and mother, from the parish of Doeuil, vicarage of Xaintes in Xaintonge, party of the first part, and Catherine Annenontak, Huron daughter of Nicolas Arendanki and Jeanne Otre-ho-Andet, father and mother, from the town of St. Madeleine in the Conception parish, in the land of the Hurons, party of the second part, and having received their mutual consent, I solemnly joined them in marriage and gave them the marriage blessing, in the presence of witnesses: Rev. Fathers' Lalemant, Superior, and Francois LeMercier of the company of Jesus Martin Boutet known as St Martin, Mr Jean Madry, etc. Signe!
d H. de Bernieres

Jean Durand was an "enlistee," accepting service in Canada for three years in exchange for Board, Room, Food and Salary. Some enlistee's returned to France at the end of their service but many stayed in Canada. After April 5, 1657, Jean Durand is likely to have sailed on a 250 ton merchant ship named 'Les Armes d' Amsterdam,'from La Rachelle. Jean had signed a contract with a merchant company of La Rachelle named, Giagneur-Grignon, (Anthoine Grignon, Jean Grignon(Son of Anthoine), Pierre Gaigneur, (Son-in-Law of Anthoine)and Jacques Masse.

That Jean may have satisfied his service contract as a soldier, is suggested by his use of the nickname,"dit Lafortune". This practice was common for enlistee's who served as soldiers in New France.

In the Durand Book, the author also speculates that Jean Durand may have been become accquainted with a Charles Gautier and his family in the Trois Rivieres, (Three Rivers) community near Quebec.

On November 21,1660 Jean Durand entered into contract to lease land from Charles Gautier in Cap-Rouge in the sovereignty of Boisverdun. This lease land included tillable acerage, timber rights and fishing rights. As part of the contract Jean agreed to provide 15,000lbs of eel to Mr.Gautier on an annual basis. At the time eel was one of the principal foods of the colonists. Jean Durand paired up with a Jean Drouard to fulfill this lease aggreement. This was a time of high Iroquois activity with them killing and taking prisoner many colonists. At this time the population of the colony was approximately 2000 and any losses due to Indian predation heavily impacted colonists.

Etienne Durand a witness at the wedding of Jean Durand and Catherine Annennontak, relationship unknown.

In the Durand Book, in a section titled 'Bulletin' at the begining of the book the book's author states the following; "There are many more Durand names in the book--the name of Jean Durand, briefly mentioned, stating that he had many descendent, lends credence to the supposition he could be of our line, uncle,coui, or whatever, while there was an unexplained Etienne Durand who served as a witness at the wedding of Jean Durand and Catherine Annenontak."

Roger Durand geneology states that he died in St-Jean, I.O., Quebec 
Durand dit Lafortune Jean
 
58 SOUR @S2@
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PAGE Ancestry Family Trees
QUAY 3 
Erichsen Gunder
 
59 Fille a marier Fafard Françoise
 
60 SOUR @S2@
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PAGE Ancestry Family Trees
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Fergusson Agnes
 
61 Fille du roi Gambier Marguerite
 
62 Accidental death Garnier dit Grenier Françoise
 
63 Jacques Gaultier
1647-1715
This is a translation of the text published by Michel Langlois in his "Dictionnaire Biographique des Ancêtres Québécois".
"Baptized on Sunday June 2, 1647, in St-Vivien, Rouen in Normandy, (Seine-Maritime), son of Simon Gauthier and Marie Aubé, he contracts marriage before the notary Rageot, on Sunday September 11, 1672, with Élisabeth-Ursule Denevers, born circa 1658, daughter of Étienne Denevers and Anne Hayot. Nine children are born from their union. His wife having died, he contracts marriage in front of Guillaume Denevers, on Saturday July 28, 1703, with Françoise-Marguerite Lambert, born in Saint-Augustin, on Wednesday August 26 1671, daughter of Aubin Lambert and Élisabeth Aubert and widow of Michel Chatel, he marries her in Saint Nicolas on Saturday July 28, 1703. from their union are born three children.
He arrives in the country around 1665. A person named Jacques Gauthier receives the scapular of Mount-Carmel in Quebec, September 25 1665. Is this him? It is possible. One thing is sure, the Jacques Gauthier described as a "poigneur" who works for Jean Lemire at the time of the censuses of 1666 and 1667 is truly him. On January 15, 1672, the Jesuits concede to him, jointly with Pierre Yvelain, land of ninety acres in surface in their seigniory of Saint Gabriel. On June 17, 1673, his neighbor Pierre Yvelain who is preparing for war against the Iroquois, wills him all his goods in the event of death. With the return of Pierre Yvelain, on the following 3rd of October, they sell to the soldier Doménique Dorlac dit Destourneaux, the land they hold jointly. They get 90 "livres" (pounds) for it. Jean Migneron of Cap-Rouge sells him, on June 10, 1674, a dwelling at the coast of Lauzon, for the price of 16 pounds and eight days of work as carpenter.
This land is close to that of his father-in-law, Étienne Denevers. Always in company with Pierre Yvelain and in partnership with Pierre Morin, on the following 23rd of December, they promise to deliver to the carpenter Rene Rhéaume the quantity of two thousand feet of pine and cedar wood for 300 pounds.
He is soon established on his land at Lauzon. On February 4, 1675, he passes a contract with the Sieur De Bermen, lawyer of the heirs of deceased Jean de Lauzon. Even if at the signing of the contract of concession of his lands, it was entered an amount for the fishing rights, he is not obliged to pay the 4 pounds per year. On August 8, 1676, he sells his land on the Saint-Charles River to Pierre Morin, for the sum of 200 pounds. He declares, on November 22, 1679, that it is impossible for him to subsist on his two pieces of land in Lauzon because the fishing rights do not belong to him. The Sieur of Bermen agrees to grant these fishing rights for the sum of 12 pounds and 8 "sols". He sells at once his two pieces of land, on the same day, to Nicolas Marion dit Lafontaine for the sum of 200 pounds. In company with Daniel Denevers, on January 23, 1680, he contracts to supply one thousand masts of white pine to Pierre Niel. Half of these masts must measure forty feet and the other half thirty six to thirty eight feet. They obtain 3 pounds per mast.
On the following 23rd of January, the Ursulines concede to him, jointly with Léonard Debord, land of ten acres and a half frontage by forty acres in depth on the Platon de Sainte-Croix, for a rent of 40 pounds annually. On the same day, he comes to an agreement with Léonard Debord who agrees to give him his dwelling at the end of six years, on condition that he refunds him for the improvements he will have made there. On April 9th of the same year, Antoine Bisson discharges him from the obligation to build with him a hangar for the Seminar of Quebec. He gives him the 50 pounds received in advance for this work. On May 3rd, he transfers to Nicolas Marion a contract for the sum of 17 pounds owed him by Étienne Denevers. That same day, the Sieur René-Louis Chartier de Lotbinère concedes him, jointly with Léonard Debord, land nine acres and two poles frontage by thirty acres in depth in his seigneurie. This land is contiguous with that which he owns on the Platon de Sainte-Croix. On November 23rd, of this same years 1680, Pierre Gacien owes him 40 pounds for two barrels of salted eels.
At the census of 1681, he declares having a rifle, a cow and three acres of cleared land. The Ursulines concede to him a new piece of land of six acres frontage by forty acres in depth in their seigneurie of Sainte-Croix, on June 3 1683. On July 26th 1688, he proceeds to ground an exchange of land with Guillaume Denevers. On March 11th, 1690, he contracts to deliver ten barrels of eels to Jean Picart for 18 pounds per barrel. On November 14, 1693, he owes 100 pounds to Jean Hamel. The Sieur Alexis Fleury concedes land in Deschambault, on May 3, 1697, to his sons Joseph and François-Alexis. He accepts these concessions on their behalf. On July 26, 1698, he comes to an agreement with Guillaume Denevers to share land of ten acres and half which he holds in Platon de Sainte-Croix. He keeps the part on the south-western side of the brook between their houses, and Guillaume Denevers retains the part on the north-eastern side, with the proviso that he clear three acres and a half of land on his dwelling.
The Ursulines concede to him fishing rights on his dwelling of Sainte-Croix on the following 24th of October. Again, on April 25, 1701, the Sieur Alexis Fleury concedes land to his François sons and Joseph in Deschambault and he accepts it for them. He recognizes, November 28, 1702, a debt of 480 pounds for goods owed to Nicolas Pinaud. On August 4, 1705, he owes 223 pounds 13 "sols" and 5 "deniers" to the succession of deceased Charles Aubert De Lachesnaye. On the following 10 October, the Sieur Riverin frees him from a debt of 50 pounds. On July 10, 1708, Guillaume Denevers who, as promised into 1698, did not clear the three acres and a half of land, cancels clause in the official report of Jean Le Rouge of September 2, 1703. Jean-Baptiste Groleau gives frees him of a debt of 30 pounds on October 21, 1709, and the Sieur Barbel of 85 pounds, on November 4, 1710.
He proceeds with the inventory of the goods of his first marriage by the notary of Laneuville on June 30, 1711, and the Chambalon notary establishes his accounts, August 30, 1711. The proceeds of all his goods amount to 4683 pounds 18 "sols" and 6 "deniers". After the debts are paid, he is left with 1865 pounds 9 "sols" and 2 "deniers". His heirs obtain 222 pounds and 7 "sols" each.
With the agreement of his wife, on February 18, 1714, he sells the share of land in Lauzon which he is owed by the succession of her late father Aubin Lamert. They obtain 110 pounds for it. On February 2, 1715 he authorizes his sons Jean-Baptiste and Étienne to exchange a parcel of land in the seignieurie of Sainte-Croix. He dies shortly after, because his widow proceeds to the auction of their goods by the notary Laneuville, on the following 2 April."
Translation from an extract of "Dictionnaire Biographique des Ancêtres Québécois" by Michel Langlois.
http://www.association-gauthier.org

Copyright © 1999 Association de généalogie des familles Gauthier
Any reproduction of this site without the permission of the authors is prohibited. 
Gauthier Jacques
 
64 This day the 28th of September 1699, Pierre Genereux, soldier of Monsieur le Chevalier de Grais, of the Bishopric of Limoges, and Francoise Marie Dessureaux were married at the church of N.D. de la Visitation in Champlain. This short excerpt from the marriage record of Pierre Genereux and Francoise Dessureaux is all that is known of Pierre Genereux's origins. For the past three years I have reviewed that record, Pierre's captain, his company, the history of the Franche-Marines, notary records involving Pierre Genereux, and the church records of Berthier and the surrounding area. With a fair degree of probability, I have come to the following conclusions concerning Pierre Genereux's life, recruitment as a soldier, and the approximate years of his birth and death. I have also compiled a list of his children, grand-children and great-grand-children.
Two of the major genealogy dictionaries state Pierre Genereux was a soldier of de Grais. The third dictionary that he was a soldier of La Groye. The key and solution to this difference can be found in the title of Chevalier, which is a rank of the Order of Saint Louis. De Grais had received this title, and was often referred to as Chevalier, well in advance of Pierre Genereux's marriage in 1699. La Groye however did not receive this title until 1705.
De Grais dit de Preaux was the title of Monsieur Louis Joseph LeGoues, a retired officer of an earlier deployment of troops. On April 4, 1687, he was commissioned captain of one company of the Franche-Marines. The 50 men of his company, including Pierre Genereux, were among the 150 recruits who had arrived in Canada the previous year. They had sailed from France aboard the trading vessel "Saint-Francois-Xavier", and arrived in Quebec on September 22, 1686. When Pierre Genereux was recruited, he would have been between the minimum age of 16 and the maximum age of 25, which would place his birth between the years of 1661 and 1670.
De Grais was assigned to patrol and protect the inhabitants in the area of La Prairie. It is historically recorded that, on September 4, 1690, five of his men along with some inhabitants were attacked, and killed by the Iroquois at the fork of the meadow of Magdeleine. It is also recorded, that in 1696 de Grais and his company took part in a major campaign. A force of over 1000 men attacked the Onnontague village located on the eastern shore of Lake Ontario. The location is near present day Oswego, New York. The village was deserted, and there was no major encounter with the Indians, but the village was entirely destroyed.
During the years of 1698 and 1699 two orders of the French King greatly affected the future life of Pierre Genereux. Orders were issued that the size of the companies of marines were to be reduced from 50 to 30 men. And secondly that early discharge with one year's pay would be granted to any soldier willing to marry and settle upon the land in Canada. These orders were possible, because the war with the Indians had subsided and the negotiations for peace were on going. Pierre Genereux along with over 100 other soldiers took advantage of this offer and married in 1699.
There are 22 notary acts in which Pierre Genereux's name appears. Many of them also included the name of his wife Francoise Dessureaux. Thirteen of them are land purchases made by Pierre or transfers of those lands, mostly to his children. Nine of them are the marriage contracts of his children. Two of these notary acts are of significant interest. The act of November 25, 1709, by the notary Normandin, concedes to Pierre Genereux, one area of land situated in the fife of Berthier. It was on the north shore of the North Channel of the St. Lawrence River. The eastern boundary of the land was adjacent to the Lord of Berthier's land. The eastern border was also adjacent to were the future Sainte-Genevieve church was to be built.
The act of May 19, 1742, by the notary Puyperoux de LaFosse, is the marriage contract of Jean Genereux and Marguerite Riviere. Jean is the youngest, and the last child of Pierre Genereux and Francoise Dessureaux to marry. This contract gives us an indication of when Pierre Genereux died. The contract states that both Pierre and Francoise were present and acting in the interest of their son Jean, at the signing of this contract. Pierre Genereux was alive at this time, yet no record can be found of his death in the pursuing years. The reason being that although there are some parish records for Berthier in the St. Joseph of Lanoraie parish registry prior to 1733, no individual parish registry for Berthier exists between 1733 and 1751. At best then, it can be determined that Pierre died between May 19, 1742 and January 1, 1751.
http://www.geninfo.org/genereux/ c. James J. Simon 
Généreux Pierre
 
65 Carignan soldier, La Fouille co. Gerlaise dit Saint-Amant Jean Jacques
 
66 Fille du roi Gilles Marie Jeanne
 
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68 Une plaque commémorative a été apposée dans l'église de La Poterie. Goulet Louise Anne
 
69 Of St-Savin de Poitiers, Poitou, France. Greslon Jacques
 
70 "tisserand" Greslon dit Laviolette Jacques
 
71 He had stayed in Acadia in the employ of Pierre Desportes. Grimard Élie
 
72 Of bourg de Denant, commune de Nieul-sur-l'Autise, diocese de LaRochelle, Poitou, France. Guibeau Antoine
 
73 Alt. Name: Jean GUIBEAU Guibeau Jean
 
74 No baptism listed (PRDH online site). Guilbault Marie-Amable
 
75 Arthur Harnois
Age: 90
Bayfield County Journal
Published: Thursday, November 21, 2002 3:00 AM CST

Arthur L. Harnois, 90, Washburn died Sunday, November 17, 2002 at Northern Lights Health Care Center in Washburn. He was born June 23, 1912 in Saskatchewan, Canada, the son of Esdras and Lottie (Pickthorn) Harnois.

Arthur moved with his parents to Washburn in 1920. He served in the U.S. Army during WWII. He married Ruth (Chambers) Jacob on July 22, 1946 in Ashland. He worked for over twenty years at Splicewood in Ashland. He also raised and sold strawberries and raspberries in Washburn for several years. Arthur was a member of the Moose Lodge of Washburn and he enjoyed gardening, woodworking, hunting and fishing.

He is survived by his wife of 56 years, Ruth Harnois of Washburn; four sons, Clifford Harnois of Marinette, Grant (Barbara) Harnois of Minneapolis, Minn., Richard (Jan) Harnois of Brooklyn Park, Minn., and Mark (Martha) Harnois of Middleton; 12 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren; a brother, Harold (Dorothy) Harnois of Brainerd, Minn.; and nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents; a daughter, Mary Lou Bade; and a brother, Joseph Harnois.

A funeral service will be held at 3 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 23, 2002 at the Washburn United Methodist Church, with Rev. James Ross officiating. Visitation will be one hour prior to the service at the church. Burial will take place in the Calvary Cemetery in Washburn.

Bratley Funeral Home of Washburn is assisting the family with arrangements. 
Harnois Arthur Leo
 
76 Arthur worked on farms in the area and attended Ondossagon High School for a short time. In 1928 he spent some time working for a cousin, Elmer McKay, at Lake Namekagon. In 1929 he went to Detroit with George Jacobsen. George had brothers there and Art had relatives. They found work and stayed a short time. Following this Art spent several years out West, including some time in the Civilian Conservation Corps. He served in World War II from May 1942 until his discharge in January 1946. After his discharge he cut pulp, worked at the pulp hoist in Ashland, and put in several years at Splicewood Corporation in Ashland. During these years he has raised garden crops and berries and done creative woodwork for hobbies.

Arthur married the former Ruth Chambers in 1946. They have five children, four of whom are married with families. Mary Lou Bade is married to a Methodist minister and continues to work in her field which is social work. Clifford, who graduated from Stout University, teaches metal work at Marinette High School, Grant is a machinist working in Minneapolis. Richard, also in Minneapolis, works as a computer programmer for Prudential Insurance.
Mark, after receiving his degree in Civil Engineering from UW-Platteville, returned to Washburn and worked for Wilhelm Engineering. This Ashland based engineering firm was selected as the principle consulting firm for the Washburn Marina. As a resident engineer for the project, Mark checked out the harbor layout for the Marina, helped with the building and pier layout, worked on the main design and spec work and was responsible for the inspection of the project during construction. The breakwater bins at the Marina are said to be the longest in the world and warranted a write-up in Engineering News Record. The cost conscious design, which made the project possible, had much to do with it being an Award Winning Project. When his responsibilities in the construction of the Marina were finished in late 1982, Mark left the area to continue his engineering work with a firm in Baraboo, Wisconsin. 
Harnois Arthur Leo
 
77 The story of the Harnois family in Washburn spans the time from the days of the saw mills in Slab Town to the present Marina on the waterfront. Doubtless, the promise of work in the saw mills and pine woods drew many people to Washburn, some of whom left after a short time and others who stayed to become part of the city.

One who came and eventually chose to stay was Clement Harnois. He arrived here in 1892, bringing with him his family consisting of his wife Marguerite, their four children, Esdras, Evangelist, Estelle and Issac, and a son by a former marriage, Charley. The four children of Clement and Marguerite had been born in Stoney Point, Ontario, from which area they came.

Evidently, Clement and Charley soon found work in the logging camps and saw mills. Esdras, who was about seven or eight when they came, remembers in his childhood years walking out to the barrens to pick blueberries, and staying with his father in a logging camp near Headquarters. When he was ready to return, Charley, who was a brakeman on a logging train, would let him ride the train home.

The Harnois family became devout members of the St. Louis Catholic church, and the children attended the St. Louis School. The parents spoke French, and were not able to read or write in English. Names on deeds were signed with x's and witnessed. The 1896-97 Washburn City Directory lists Clement Harnois (spelled Harwois - apparently the editors were not French) residing on Bigelow Street.

As was the case with most laboring families, they kept livestock to help out with the food supply. In later years they had a cow, some chickens and a pig. They needed more space to raise hay for their cow so eventually purchased the family home at 1022 West Bayfield Street. Old receipts show payments on the house made to Dr. T. R. Spears in 1900 and 1901. The lots were apparently purchased from the county - one at a time - on tax title, from 1904 to 1914.

At that time the main road went through Slabtown and there was no way to cross the ravine next to Tenth Avenue. Not until the death of Mrs. Clement Harnois, May 11, 1931, was Highway 13 established in its present location and the ravine filled in. It was said that Marguerite's first trip across the ravine was in the hearse. It would also be of interest to note that many years later Highway 13 had an additional impact on the house. On March 3, 1981, the house, which had been the family home for the Clement Harnois and later the Esdras Harnois family, was knocked down and burned to make room for the improvements in the highway that summer.

By the early 1900's, the decline in the logging industry caused a scarcity of jobs in the area. At the same time there was a growing interest in agriculture. This may have influenced Clement Harnois to return to Canada in 1904, taking his sons Charley and Esdras with him. Clement and Charley homesteaded adjoining land in Saskatchewan. Esdras, who had to wait until he was 21 before he could file, homesteaded a few miles away. Charley remained in Canada. He married and had a son. Esdras remained and in 1908 married Lottie Pickthorn who was working in a cook shack for Charley's threshing crew. Joe, Arthur and Harold were all born in Canada.

In the meantime, Marguerite was left home in Washburn to keep the rest of the family together and care for the livestock. Because the boys had grown up around the sawmills, it was natural they would look for work in that area. Apparently, both Evangelist and Isacc worked in the woods.
Evangelist worked in local sawmills, logging camps and was brakeman on logging railroads and Great Northern Railroad. He enlisted in the Army Air Service in World War I on March 6, 1918, and was discharged January 25, 1919, after spending six months in the hospital recovering from injuries received when the plane he was navigating was shot down. Because of his health, he spent most of his remaining years in the South and West. He did not marry. He died in 1955 at the age of 67, and is buried in Calvary Cemetery in Washburn.

Isaac also worked in logging camps. In a note to his brother, Esdras, written about 1905, he says, "I put in 65 working days but I quit yesterday and am going to Bayfield tomorrow. They want men all over to work. There was a foreman at Ashland last night and he was looking for men but he did not get a one so there ain't many men idle." Isaac left home before 1920 and spent most of his life in Chippewa Falls, coming back to Court Manor in Ashland where he spent his remaining years.

Estelle was married to Emil Roberts in 1913, and lived in Washburn the rest of her life, raising a family of 11 children. During the early years of marriage she lived in the square house across the ravine from her parents. This house is now occupied by the Bob Bodins (1985).

Clement returned to Washburn in 1912. He would have been 67 years of age at this time. To help with food supply and income, they raised raspberries in the ravine and continued to keep a cow, chickens and pigs. Clement cut hay with a hand scythe to feed the cow. Marguerite took in washings, sewed and made quilts. A velvet quilt which she made in later years is still in the Art Harnois family.

By 1920, Clement and Marguerite were alone and in declining health, so the Esdras Harnois family returned from Canada. The boys attended the Garfield School for a few months while they were staying with their grandparents. Then the family moved to a farm north of the Wannebo Road next to the Lambert Bourgo place. The house consisted of two small rooms with a loft overhead and a lean-to shed. Although the house in town was insulated with sawdust, not even that much was present in the house on the farm. In the winter the snow would blow in between the cracks in the wall in the upstairs loft. Art and Harold slept downstairs in the winter but Joe stuck it out upstairs one year.

While living on the farm the boys attended the Three Switch School and later the Progress School. Their teachers included Inez Urquhart (later Thornton) and Lena Holt. Esdras worked in the Box Factory until it closed and later went to Drummond and worked in the woods.

In the late 1920's, the family moved in with their parents in order to care for them. Marguerite spent some time bedridden before her death in 1931, when she was nearly 78 years old. Clement lived a relatively active life until his death in 1938, just short of 93 years of age.

By the time of the move the boys were working out for other people on farms in the area. Joe was the only one who finished high school. This was in 1928 and that fall he and his father went to Canada for the harvesting season. 
Harnois Clément
 
78 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Harnois Harold Ernest
 
79 Isaac Harnois
1641 - 3/22/1703

Isaac was the Son of Abraham Harnois and Marie Adrien, of the village of Yvetot, Rouen, Normandie (Seine-Maritime province) France. Abraham was born in 1616 in Yvetot, and died on January 18, 1670 in Yvetot. Marie Adrien was born in 1620 in Yvetot and died on January 18, 1670 at Yvetot.

Isaac was born in 1641 at Yvetot. He was confirmed on May 1, 1662 in Quebec, Canada. He died March 22, 1703 at Sainte-Foye, Quebec.

Isaac entered into a marriage contract on January 8, 1670 before Maitre Pierre Duquet, notary of Saint-Augustin, Quebec. He was married on January 18, 1670 in the church of Saint-Augustin, in Quebec to Marguerite Blaise, born and baptized on April 29, 1653 in the parish of Saint-Similien-les-Nantes. She was the daughter of Jean Blaise and Mathurine Malescot (or Marrecot). She emigrated to Nouvelle-France (Canada) in 1669. She died on June 15, 1726, at Saint-Augustin, Quebec, Canada.

On September 30, 1669 Marguerite Blaise entered into a marriage contract with Laurent Poire before the notary Duquet, but the contract was annulled immediately. She then entered into a marriage contract with Jean Pequet in Quebec, on October 23, 1669, before Maitre Roman Bequet, notary of Sillery, and was married on the same date. Pequet, of France, was the son of Pierre Pequet and Suzanne Bilodeau. Shortly after her marriage to Jean Pequet, Marguerite was widowed and was remarried to Isaac Harnois.

Isaac Harnois died at Sainte-Foy in 1703, and Marguerite died on June 16, 1726 at Saint-Augustin, Quebec. 
Harnois Isaac
 
80 Joe got his start as a mechanic working for George Welty in his service station. Later he worked at the Ford Garage in Ashland. He was still working there in the fall of 1948 when he had a serious accident at Thompson's Creek on his way home from work. After a long recovery he went to work for Peterson's Garage, and later Williamson's Garage in Washburn. But he is probably best remembered when he operated Joe's West End Conoco Station at the corner of Bayfield Street and Eighth Avenue West during the 1960's and '70's. He had a reputation as a first class mechanic.

Joe married Edith Bassett from Ashland in 1931, and lived in Washburn until his retirement. They had two children, Ervin and Audrey. Ervin was a freshman when the Walker High School burned in 1947. He served in the Navy following graduation. He has three children from his marraige to Betty Brenholt - Michael (Mike), Kathy and Greg, all of whom finished high school it Washburn. Audrey has lived in Superior since her marriage to Roger Samuelson of Port Wing. She has five children. 
Harnois Joseph Charles
 
81 Esdras spent the sailing seasons of 1930 and 1931 on the Great Lakes, working as a fireman. Later he worked for the city supervising a WPA project. During World War II both Lottie and Esdras worked as stewardess and porter, respectively, on the Great Lakes. They sailed together for three years, one on the A. E. Nettleton and two on the Sewell Avery. Following this, Esdras spent a couple of years cutting pulp and then returned to sailing until his retirement. They had sold their livestock before going sailing together, but continued to raise a garden and berries. In the early fall they would pick apples at Bayfield and later flesh mink. In their 1953 season for fleshing mink, they did 323 pelts in 6-1/2 days and made $81.25, about 25 cents per pelt.

Lottie believed in conserving everything. She did a lot of home canning of meats, fruits and vegetables. She was careful in her methods, and used a pressure cooker for her canning. She enlisted the help of her family in getting the food ready. Many were the times the family would go out to pick wild blueberries, sometimes staying overnight. Lottie liked to do handwork, particularly quilts. She had many quilting bees at her house. She also was a good cook, and always had something to offer her own and her children's friends. One of the foods her family will always remember is their blood sausage. Even in later years when they had to find someone who was butchering in order to get the fresh blood, they continued to make it. 
Harnois Joseph Esdras
 
82 Odessa American
Odessa, TX
1 Nov 2001

MIDLAND - Mary Lou Bade died peacefully early Sunday morning, Oct. 28, 2001, surrounded by her family.

Mary Lou spent her early years in Brule and Washburn, Wis. She was an active member of 4H clubs and once won a cherry pie baking contest. She got her bachelor's degree (and met her husband) at UW Madison. She went on to receive a master's degree in social work from UW Milwaukee and did some doctoral work at the University of Chicago. Her social work career began at Neighborhood House in Milwaukee, after which she worked with Jewish Vocational Services establishing halfway houses for developmentally disabled adults. She worked as assistant director of Pepin County Human Services before becoming director of Lutheran Social Services in Elkhorn, Wis.

After moving to Midland in 1996, she developed Project A.D.A.M., and later created Pathways To A Better Life, an organization designed to help youth and adults better manage anger and rage. A member of the Midland Musician's Club, she played clarinet in the Midland Community Band and piano for the Midland Community Jazz Band. She was also pianist for Hollowell United Methodist Church. An active participant in various churches all her life, she held conference offices for the United Methodist Women. She served on the Mental Health Committee of the Northwest Texas Annual Conference. She also chaired the Domestic Violence Committee for St. Luke's United Methodist Church. She enjoyed nature, photography and spending time with loved ones.

She leaves behind her loving husband Dennis; daughters, Renee of Los Angeles and Elizabeth of Madison, Wis.; her parents, Art and Ruth Harnois of Washburn, Wis.; and brothers, Richard, Grant, Clifford and Mark and their families.

A memorial service has been scheduled for 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 2, 2001, at St. Luke's United Methodist Church, 3011 W. Kansas Ave.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorials in Mary Lou's name to Hollowell United Methodist Church, St. Luke's United Methodist Church or Hospice of Midland. 
Harnois Mary Lou
 
83 of the Central Southern Illinois Synod (ELCA) Harnois Michael David
 
84 Facts about this person:

Text
at least 8 children of whom records were found 
Harnois Pierre André
 
85 Carignan soldier, Saurel co. Hénault dit Canada Jacques
 
86 Informant on death certificate was William Sorensen of Menomonie. Hennrickson Anna Christena
 
87 HERTEL DE LA FRESNIÈRE, JACQUES, soldier, interpreter, and settler, father of the famous François Hertel*; b. at Fécamp (Normandy), son of Nicolas Hertel and Jeanne Miriot; d. 10 Aug. 1651 at Trois-Rivières.

It is probable, although there is no written proof of it, that he arrived in the country about 1626, as a soldier. He spent among the Algonkins the years during which Quebec was occupied by the Kirke brothers. No doubt as a reward for the good relations that he had maintained with the Indians, the Compagnie des Cent-Associés granted him, by a title-deed dated 16 Dec. 1633 at Paris, a 200-acre tract of land at Trois-Rivières; with Jean Godefroy de Lintot he was the first settler there, before the official founding of that post. Hertel served as an interpreter for the Jesuits among the Indians, and was the settlers' syndic in 1647. He died 10 Aug. 1651 in the prime of life, it is believed accidentally. On 23 Aug. 1641 he had married Marie Marguerie, a sister of the interpreter, by whom he had had three children: François, nicknamed the "hero of Trois-Rivières," who was baptized by Father Brébeuf 3 July 1642, whose godfather was François Marguerie, and whose godmother was Marguerite Couillard, the wife of Jean Nicollet; Madeleine, b. 2 Sept. 1645, who on 29 Aug. 1658 married Louis Pinard, the surgeon of the fort at Trois-Rivières; and Marguerite, b. 26 Aug. 1649, who became the wife of Jean Crevier, the seigneur of Saint François, in 1663. In 1652 Marie Marguerie remarried; her second husband was Quentin Moral de Saint-Quentin.

Raymond Douville

Archives de la paroisse de l'Immaculée-Conception, Trois-Rivières, Registres. JR (Thwaites). P.-G. Roy, Inv. concessions, II, 4– 5. Godbout, Les pionniers de la région trifluvienne.

http://www.biographi.ca/009004-119.01-e.php?&id_nbr=337&interval=50&&PHPSESSID=3jhedvp7l8h1in7gojao345e47 
Hertel de la Fresnière Jacques
 
88 Une plaque commémorative a été apposée sur la rue Louis Houde à Manou le 25-06-1994. Houde Louis
 
89 died of the plague Hourdouille Quentin
 
90 Andrew's father was George Imrick, a German soldier who was onmaneuvers in Slovakia. They were camped in a farm field of AnnaKolarchick. They married and had Andrew. George died when Andrew was2 years old. Anna remarried John Justiniac. They had 7 children.They came to America and settled in Ironwood, Michigan. Andrew stayedbehind with his grandparents in Slovakia. At 19 he would have to beregistered for the Army and be drafted. So at night he crossed riversand woods to get out. People helped him to hide. He arrived in NewYork city and then on to Ironwood. His mother didn't know he wascoming. He got a job delivering groceries and delivered them to hismother. She didn't recognize him.

Told by Cele Imrick to Jean Imrick Brenholt 
Imrick Andrew
 
91 Carignan soldier, Maximy company Inard dit Provençal Paul
 
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Jones Mark
 
93 Drowned during a war with the Iroquois. Juillet dit Avignon Blaise
 
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Klemmer Christine
 
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Klemmer Jane Mary
 
96 childbirth Lamarche Charlotte
 
97 Fille du roi Lamarche Charlotte
 
98 Captain in the French Navy. Langlois Guillaume
 
99 ?Fille du roi Langlois Marie
 
100 Guillaume Langlois and Jeanne Millet of Saint-Leonard-des-Parcs, Normandy, France had a son, Noel born in 1606. His birthplace is not far from Mortagne in Perche. This lends credence to the opinion that he knew the people from that city before going to New France with them. His village today has a small church that dates from the middle ages, and the surrounding countryside has farms, for raising race horses.

The time of his arrival at Beauport remains controversial, but it seems most likely that it was in 1633. One year later the surgeon Robert Giffard arrived to take possession of his Seigneurie, Beauport. July 25, 1634 Robert Giffard laid the cornerstone for his manor house and the same day Noel Langlois took Francoise Grenier as his wife. This was the fourth marriage in New France and the first since the return of the French in 1633. It was a very festive occasion for this little frontier community.

The immigrant Noel Langlois accumulated considerable land and worked hard clearing it. It took a man all year to clear a little over an arpent of land, so he hired new immigrants to help in this task. His work as a carpenter helped pay them. He could not sign his name on documents, so affixed his mark a reversed N. He shared his earnings with the church. In 1657 he gave a piece of yellow cloth for cutting the blessed bread, to Notre Dame de Recouverance in Quebec.

Old Noel was serious about his role as patriarch. He saw that his two sons named jean had suitable land on the Ile d'Orleans for their shipbuilding enterprise. When the youngest son, Noel wanted to leave the family homestead, parental pressure kept him there.

Francoise Grenier the first wife of Noel died following an accident in 1666. Nine months later he married an old friend Marie Crevet, the widow of Robert Caron. In the marriage contract, Noel agreed to look after her young daughter Aimee Caron.

In time chemistry developed between Aimee and the younger Noel. Their first born arrived in 1673. No record of their marriage can be found in the church registers. They eventually signed their marriage contract in 1677. They had a total of five children. Their daughter Marie Anne Langlois born in 1675 married Jean Cote.

Probably the Langlois household sheltered men of the Carignan Regiment while young Noel was still an adolescent. Among these men was a dashing young officer, Francois de Traversy. The Indians killed Traversy while he was hunting on the shores of Lake Champlain. So when young Noel decided to take a dit name to differentiate himself from his father, he chose Traversy. 
Langlois Noël
 

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